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Could this revolutionary jab help destroy the cancer that killed Patrick Swayze? Scientists trial 'ground-breaking' vaccine they hope will protect people from the deadly disease

Scientists are trialling a potentially ground-breaking vaccine that they hope will protect people from developing pancreatic cancer. A team at Johns Hopkins University (JHU) in the US has just given the preventative jab to their first volunteer, a woman with a family history of the disease.

dailymail.co.uk ,  2 days ago 42
Could this revolutionary jab help destroy the cancer that killed Patrick Swayze? Scientists trial 'ground-breaking' vaccine they hope will protect people from the deadly disease

US surpasses 1,000,000 Covid deaths as report finds nearly a third could’ve been averted with vaccines

The US reached the unimaginable milestone of one million Covid-19 deaths on Tuesday, according to data collected by Johns Hopkins University. The tragic milestone was reached as a report led by Brown University and Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health and Microsoft AI for Health found that at least 318,000 of the deaths could have been prevented had people received the Covid vaccine.

metro.co.uk ,  6 days ago 1
US surpasses 1,000,000 Covid deaths as report finds nearly a third could’ve been averted with vaccines

More than 1 million Americans have died from COVID-19

© Provided by Yahoo! News The United States on Tuesday passed a milestone that once seemed unimaginable: 1 million COVID-19 deaths. According to Johns Hopkins University, 1,000,004 Americans have died of complications from the coronavirus, and more than 82 million confirmed U.S. cases of COVID-19 to date.

msn.com ,  6 days ago 0
More than 1 million Americans have died from COVID-19

Someone’s just invented edible tape that stops your burrito falling apart

We’ve all been there – rushed to get a delicious burrito for dinner to find more of it ends up in your lap than in your mouth. But never fear, a clever team of engineering students have come up with a solution for that. Inspired by their own experiences with messy lunches, the chemical and biomolecular engineers have created an edible sticky tape.

metro.co.uk ,  6 days ago 1
Someone’s just invented edible tape that stops your burrito falling apart

Biden marks COVID ‘tragic milestone’ in U.S. at global summit

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden appealed to world leaders at a COVID-19 summit Thursday to reenergize a lagging international commitment to attacking the virus as he led the U.S. in marking the “tragic milestone” of 1 million deaths in America. He ordered flags lowered to half-staff and warned against complacency around the globe.

msn.com ,  11 days ago 1
Biden marks COVID ‘tragic milestone’ in U.S. at global summit

Vascular dementia: How do you feel at night? You could be at risk of brain decline

VASCULAR dementia is a common type of dementia caused by reduced blood flow to the brain. The NHS says it is estimated to affect around 150,000 people in the UK. Johns Hopkins University says confusion, which may increase at night, is associated with vascular dementia. It notes this is known as "sundown syndrome".

express.co.uk ,  12 days ago 110
Vascular dementia: How do you feel at night? You could be at risk of brain decline

Pandemic gets tougher to track as COVID testing plunges

Testing for COVID-19 has plummeted across the globe, making it much tougher for scientists to track the course of the pandemic and spot new, worrisome viral mutants as they emerge and spread. Experts say testing has dropped by 70 to 90% worldwide from the first to the second quarter of this year — the opposite of what they say should be happening with new omicron variants on the rise in places such as the United States and South Africa.

msn.com ,  13 days ago 0
Pandemic gets tougher to track as COVID testing plunges

NASA to hurl aircraft into space to smash asteroid at 23,000km an hour and save Earth

The £240m mission is expected to take place in September as new technology is being developed to hurl a half-tonne spacecraft into an asteroid called Dimorphos similar to the Netflix film Don't Look Up NASA is getting ready to smash an asteroid with an aircraft at 23,000 kilometres per hour to prevent it from colliding with Earth.

mirror.co.uk ,  15 days ago 1985
NASA to hurl aircraft into space to smash asteroid at 23,000km an hour and save Earth

Nasa to SMASH giant asteroid with aircraft at 23,000kph in £240m mission to defend the earth

NASA is set to smash a giant asteroid with an aircraft at 23,000kph in a bid to defend the earth. The £240m mission, dubbed DART after Double Asteroid Redirection Test, is expected to take place in September. Movies like Armageddon and Don’t Look Up have artistically explored the consequences of existential threat.

thescottishsun.co.uk ,  16 days ago 5
Nasa to SMASH giant asteroid with aircraft at 23,000kph in £240m mission to defend the earth

Why is it hard to count the number of deaths caused by the pandemic?

The World Health Organization (WHO) has published a new estimated global death toll from the coronavirus pandemic, saying that there were close to 15 million pandemic-related deaths between 1 January 2020 and 31 December 2021. This figure is more than double the reported 6.2 million deaths from covid-19, according to data from Johns Hopkins University in Maryland and the WHO’s own figures.

newscientist.com ,  17 days ago 1
Why is it hard to count the number of deaths caused by the pandemic?

This Is the Deadliest State for COVID-19 This Month

The United States is bracing to reach 1 million COVID-19-related deaths, a figure the nation could hit in the coming weeks. So far, the COVID-19 pandemic has killed 993,744 people in the U.S., with over 11,740 deaths in the past four weeks alone, according to Johns Hopkins University - but some states are deadlier than others.

msn.com ,  19 days ago 3
This Is the Deadliest State for COVID-19 This Month

S.F.’s COVID test positive percentage tops ‘too high’ rate of 5%

The coronavirus test positivity rate in San Francisco hit 5% on Friday, according to new city data. The percentage of tests that are coming back positive — a key indicator of pandemic trends — is rising sharply and has passed a level that public health officials consider worrisome.

msn.com ,  1 month ago 0
S.F.’s COVID test positive percentage tops ‘too high’ rate of 5%

San Francisco's New COVID-19 Positivity Rate Deemed ‘Too High'

New data revealed Friday that the COVID-19 positivity rate in San Francisco is now 5%, which experts say is “too high,” according to Johns Hopkins University. This means that 5% of the people taking coronavirus tests at any medical provider in the city have tested positive for coronavirus.

msn.com ,  1 month ago 0
San Francisco's New COVID-19 Positivity Rate Deemed ‘Too High'

COVID positive test rate in S.F. tops ‘too high’ level of 5% amid statewide rise

© Gabrielle Lurie/The Chronicle… The coronavirus test positivity rate in San Francisco hit 5% on Friday, according to new city data. The percentage of tests that are coming back positive — a key indicator of pandemic trends — is rising sharply and has passed a level that public health officials consider worrisome.

msn.com ,  1 month ago 0
COVID positive test rate in S.F. tops ‘too high’ level of 5% amid statewide rise

Lab-grown stem cells can repair muscle injury and disease, study shows

Mice with muscle-wasting disorder injected with stem cells ran twice as far on mini treadmills Scientists have cultivated human muscle stem cells capable of renewing themselves and repairing muscle tissue damage in mice, an advance that may lead to new ways of treating wasting disorders in people. In the research, published in the journal Cell Stem Cell, scientists genetically reprogrammed lab-cultured human skin cells into a more primitive state in which they can develop into almost any type of cell in the body.

independent.co.uk ,  1 month ago 0
Lab-grown stem cells can repair muscle injury and disease, study shows

COVID-19 cases on the rise in the United States

The subvariant of Omicron that's more transmissible than BA.1 was responsible for new cases The US is trudging into what could be another COVID-19 surge, with cases rising nationally and in most states after a two-month decline. "We don't know how high that mountain's gonna grow," said Dr. Stuart Campbell Ray, an infectious disease expert at Johns Hopkins University.

marca.com ,  1 month ago 0
COVID-19 cases on the rise in the United States

It's not over: COVID-19 cases are on the rise again in US

The U.S. may be heading into another COVID-19 surge, with cases rising nationally and in most states after a two-month decline Yet again, the U.S. is trudging into what could be another COVID-19 surge, with cases rising nationally and in most states after a two-month decline. One big unknown?

independent.co.uk ,  1 month ago 0
It's not over: COVID-19 cases are on the rise again in US